As true-life history has proven, Native Americans, although unduly detribalized, have been able to find financial success and a certain level of autonomy through the gaming business. Could it be one way that native groups are getting back at us, by taking money through our gaming losses in return for the sins of our bluecoat great-great-grandfathers, who have never faced justice for having taken their lands after outgunning the earliest Indians?

In some states where it’s most needed, and where American Indians were discriminatorily prevented from lawfully owning a gambling establishment in their own terrain so that they might be able to provide for their impoverished families, natives are enabled to further pursue their chosen endeavors and become self-reliant in their restricted reservations rather than relying on humiliating regime charities. Many of those affected say “thanks but no thanks” to the state’s miserly handouts through the Bureau of Indian Affairs, often putting them at the mercy of low-paying work.

As the facts indicate, native populations are not lazy and never were. The common goal appears to be for their people to live free, not blocked from pursuing whatever legal entity may be on their sacred grounds, obtained via a peace treaty. The survivors were divided and dispersed, and yet, against all odds, they came through unvanquished, with a solid commitment to upholding their survival in a tough economy, regardless of ballots.

Naturally, in the present, we have to learn to live in peace, side by side, leaving primordial mayhem behind. In the final stage of reconciliation, a law was created that prohibited states or private individuals from buying or selling Indian lands without the endorsement of the federal government. I guess that is better than nothing. Still, I call this a pitiful improvement because, heck, the US government has a long way to go to duly return what was theirs.

Some people assume that because certain Native American reservations have done well for themselves via the casinos, all can. The truth is that most reservations and Indian communities are as poor as, or below the poverty level of, third-world countries and are gripped by abject destitution, utter desperation, and isolation. Many other tribes have inestimably demonstrated, time and time again, how proficient they can be at running fruitful casinos.

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